Interlude

It has been quiet on the blog, mostly because I spent a few weeks recharging my batteries in Europe. But it’s action time again now and there is lots of cool stuff going on! So a short blog to bring you up to speed.

IMG_8845

Getting ready to hop into the Silfra fissure

The last weeks I’ve had the pleasure of exploring some new places in Europe and meeting up with friends I had’t seen for too long. One of the highlights of the trip was that I’ve finally managed to snorkel Silfra fissure in Iceland. Silfra is a gorge in the Thingvellir national park, a rift valley between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. So snorkeling in the Silfra fissure means that you are basically snorkeling between two tectonic plates, and it’s quite the experience. Besides being very cold (it was -12°C outside and 2°C in the water), it has the coolest topography and amazing visibility, up to 100m!

IMG_8852.JPG

Silfra Fissure landscape

The Europe trip ended with a visit to the University of Tubingen, where I met up with people that do some exciting research on fish biofluorescence. The lab does some very cool work, like investigating how fish see the world, whether or not they can see fluorescence, etc. It was very interesting to talk with them and learn about their research, and fun to share my work with them.

Which brings me to what’s happening my research. I am now at the very last push of my PhD, with less than 3 months to go before submitting my thesis. There is still work to be done, but I’m happy that multiple papers are currently in review, and will hopefully be published this year. Two of those papers will be of big interest to scuba divers and photographers. One of them might even cause some commotion all the way into zoos and aquaria. I will share them here as soon as they have gone through the review process.

Lastly, some really exciting news about future work. Last month I received a grant from the Mohammed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund to run a project that will benefit one of the world’s most endangered seahorses. Together with my friend Louw, which you might remember from her guestblog, we will be looking at new ways to detect the endangered Knysna Seahorse (Hippocampus capensis). Louw and me will be collaborating with the TrEnD lab in Perth to make a difference in the conservation of this beautiful critter. This project will start immediately after handing in the PhD, so I will be able to share new critter insights for a while longer.

H. capensis_cropped

The endangered Knysna seahorse (Hippocampus capensis) – Photo: Louw Claassens

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s